[13. December 2017] - Partner website, NORDREGIO

Nunataryuk - permafrost thaw and changing arctic coast: science for socio-economic adaptation

Nanortalik Greenland Leneisja Jungsberg 3 smallA main goal of Nunataryuk is to determine the impacts of thawing land, coast and subseapermafrost on the global climate and on humans in the Arctic and to develop targeted and co-designed adaptation and mitigation strategies.

To access the full press release, please go HERE

 

[9. December 2017] - Press article. By Gert Lange

Küsten auf dem Rückzug
Das EU-Projekt »Nunataryuk« erforscht die Erosion eines Lebensraums in der Arktis.

To access the article, please go HERE.
 

 

[30. November 2017] - European Commission EASME homepage. By Gaëlle Le Bouler.

Horizon 2020 Nunataryuk project kicks off

This new Blue Growth/Arctic project will determine the impacts of thawing land, coast and subsea permafrost on global climate and on Arctic populations. It will also contribute to develop targeted and co-designed adaptation and mitigation strategies.

To read the full article, please go HERE

 

[29. November 2017] - Partner website, Max Planck Institute for meteorology

Die gefrorenen Küsten der Arktis: Ein Lebensraum schmilzt davon

Das neue EU-Projekt „Nunataryuk“ erforscht die Permafrostgebiete der Welt. 28 Partner, davon zwei Forschungsgruppen am Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie (MPI-M) geleitet von Tatiana Ilyina (Biogeochemie des Ozeans in der Abteilung „Ozean im Erdsystem“) und von Victor Brovkin (Wechselwirkung Klima-Biogeosphäre in der Abteilung „Land im Erdsystem“) tragen zu „Nunataryuk“ bei, welches vom 22.-24. November 2017 in Potsdam offiziell gestartet wurde.

To access the full article, please go HERE.

 

[22. November 2017] - Press release, AWI

20120808 Kuestenerosion Muostakh 01 TOpel 1 smallRetreating permafrost coasts threaten the fragile Arctic environment -  The EU project Nunataryuk will determine the effects of permafrost thaw on Earth’s coldest shorelines

Permafrost makes up a quarter of the landmass in the Northern Hemisphere. Climate change means that Arctic coasts are thawing and eroding at an ever greater pace, releasing additional greenhouse gases. A large EU project, coordinated by the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), is now exploring the consequences for the global climate and for the people living in the Arctic. But that’s not all: working together with residents of the Arctic region, the researchers will also co-design strategies for the future in order to cope with ongoing climate change.

To access the full press release, please go HERE.

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